1951 Volkswagen Beetle

1951 Volkswagen Beetle

1951 Volkswagen Beetle

On 30 January 1951 The inventor and creator of the Volkswagen Beetle, Prof. Dr. Ing H.C. Ferdinand Porsche died in Stuttgart at the age of 76. He was an Austro-Hungarian automotive engineer and pioneer, and was well known for creating the Volkswagen (Beetle) as well as the first of many Porsche automobiles.

In 1951 the Beetle saw some interior and exterior improvements. Volkswagen added arm-rests to the VW Käfer, but just a few months later they were already discontinued. The 1951 version of the Beetle was well-known by its split rear window (with a pillar down the center) and a new Wolfsburg crest that was added to the front hood just above the handle.

Other improvements for the '51 Beetle included chrome molding on the windshield and vents were added to the front quarter panels to improve interior ventilation. But the vents tended to make drivers cold, so they were discontinued after this model year. Telescopic shocks were also new for the 1951 VW bug. The top speed of the 1951 Beetle was 120 km per hour.

In the United States the car proved popular with a small group of aficionados of import cars, as well as drivers on a budget, who appreciated the Beetle's low cost, gas economy, and ease of repair. That year less than 400 VW's Bugs were sold in the US. In South Africa the first Beetle rolled off the line on the 31st of August 1951